Telling a Story of “Home” Through Impactful Interior Design

Telling a Story of “Home” Through Impactful Interior Design

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Telling a Story of “Home” Through Impactful Interior

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Writing The Narrative for Your Model Apartment

Stories can come from anywhere. Writers, filmmakers, artists, and architects all use the same narrative tools to tell great tales. Text towers over the narrative arts; even so, interior design and architecture provide visual mediums that inspire unparalleled awe and wonder. Sight certainly has the capacity to explain and inform just as well as words. Think of everything from the Great Pyramids to the checkered floor of Congress- all great sites possess transcendent design, both inside and out. [/trx_column_item]
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For that reason designers have the difficult task of pairing narrative elements together with raw aesthetics. Walking into a model apartment should be like opening the first page of book: a taut, forceful introduction that grabs attention and sets the stage. Interior design serves as a 1st person narrator, allowing patrons to parse through a room with an empowering I.[/trx_column_item]
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A Story in Your Model Apartment

Stepping through the living area is like introducing characters… but instead of names and motivations, interior designers use color and mood to pad the story. The second act should be played out in the kitchen— this in an important part of the narrative where pacing and tone matter most. The best aspects of the kitchen should be highlighted first, with nothing competing for the viewer’s attention other than what’s right in front of them. The middle of novels are always the most difficult to get through, and for most people, a kitchen is a make-or-break staging feature. But if the first and second acts are successfully tied together with similar themes, styles, and layouts, then the third act ostensibly writes itself—the bedroom.[/trx_column_item]
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This is the grand finale. Everything has been leading up to this moment: the great reveal. Will it be a plot twist or something the viewer expected? That is up to the interior designer. Like all great storytelling, impactful interior design should appeal to the most imaginative elements of the human character. A model apartment is part fantasy, part reality, and all-things exceptional. The bedroom should tie the whole model together nicely. It should meld thematically with the rest of the model, allowing the complete narrative to envelop the prospective resident. A great book and a great model should end the same way—when closed, they should be plastered onto the mind of the viewer, holding steady against competing thoughts and ideas, constantly harkening back to its impact. The best stories are the ones you can’t forget.[/trx_column_item]
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The Successful Storyteller

One of the most famous architects of the 20th century used raw physicality to tell great stories. His name was Frank Lloyd Wright. He was an absolute genius, crafting homes and buildings with unmatched beauty and form for the better part of 70 years. While common knowledge would dictate that architects work solely on exteriors, Lloyd was different. He rigidly forbade his clients to design the interior of their homes. From Fallingwater house to his unique Usonian model homes, Frank Lloyd Wright believed that for the narrative arc of a building to be complete, the interior must match the exterior in execution and style. [/trx_column_item]
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Could you imagine his trend-setting work with plastic chairs and cheap furniture? Of course not! He was obsessed with the same thing that all great storytellers are— theme. Breaking thematic conventions would doom artistic effort; the results would be unequal, forcing inquisitive glares instead of awe-inspired stares. Frank Lloyd Wright was perhaps the most famous and accomplished designer of the 20th century, but he was also one of its greatest storytellers.[/trx_column_item]
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Epilogue

Great artists have the same goals: to inspire, entertain, and innovate. The best art tells a story. Interior designers utilize narrative elements to stage model apartments. There are no limits beyond matching theme and style, allowing the interior designer to go wherever their art takes them. The aim of staging a model apartment is to attract and envelop prospective residents in aesthetic wonder. The designer leads them on a narrative path through the model, navigating all the twists and turns that fill a good story. Impactful interior design in a model apartment should tell a story; the story of the person who will be living there.[/trx_column_item]
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Amanda Beausoleil
amanda@model55.com

Model55 purchases, designs and installs model apartments quickly and efficiently, reducing the cost and time of setting up your own model apartment.

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